The history of ecstasy a powerful drug used by many young people in britain

Share via Email This article is over 3 years old The popularity of ecstasy, which has long been associated with rave culture, dipped when fashions changed, says Professor Fiona Measham, but there has been a resurgence in dance music. An estimatedmore people aged took ecstasy over the past year compared to two years ago, according to figures released on Thursday. About 49, more used the hallucinogen LSD over the same period.

The history of ecstasy a powerful drug used by many young people in britain

E for Ecstasy by Nicholas Saunders Chapter 3: The next time it came to light was in when the US army tested a number of drugs for military applications - again, folklore says it was tried as a truth drug but there is no evidence for this.

As a reward, the company gave him a free hand and his own lab. Having had an exciting experience on Mescaline, Shulgin used the opportunity to research psychedelic drugs.

An accepted test for psychedelic effects was to observe how fighting fish change their behaviour. But there were problems: Eventually his company was embarrassed to find themselves holding the patents of some popular street drugs and he was politely given the push. Shulgin continued testing new compounds on himself and a select group of friends for many years.

Thanks to his remarkable personality - combining openness without proselytising about his liberal and controversial views - he has earned the respect of influential people and is able to carry on with his research today, with the full approval of the US government.

His approach to psychedelics is similar to that of a botanist: MDMA is but one of psychoactive drugs which he describes in detail, and, although its effects are less dramatic than many, MDMA is perhaps the one which comes closest to fulfilling his ambition of finding a therapeutic drug.

Shulgin has now moved on to writing a book about another family of psychoactive drugs, the tryptamines, due out in However, it was only after hearing glowing reports from other experimenters who had also synthesised and tried MDMA that Shulgin took an interest. He describes how in he gave some to an old friend who was about to retire from his career of psychotherapy.

He phoned me a few days later to tell me he had abandoned his plans for a quiet retirement. I know none of the details of the increasingly complex network which he proceeded to develop over the following decade, but I do know that he travelled across the country introducing MDMA to other therapists and teaching then how to use it in their therapy.

They had all began, of course, by taking the drug themselves. He believed as I do that no therapist has the right to give a psychoactive drug to another person unless and until he is thoroughly familiar with its effects on his own mind.

Many of the psychologists and psychiatrists whom Leo instructed developed small groups or enclaves of professionals who had been similarly taught, and the information and techniques he had introduced spread widely and, in time, internationally.

It is impossible to ever know the true breadth of therapeutic MDMA usage achieved during the remaining years of his life, but at his memorial service, I asked an old friend of his whether she had a guess at the number of people he had introduced to this incredible tool, either directly or indirectly.

But perhaps the most significant obstacle to the commercial exploitation of MDMA is that it has already been patented - although the patent ran out years ago, a drug cannot be patented a second time.

The only way of recouping that expense is by obtaining exclusive rights to sell the drug through holding its patent. In Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas, Ecstasy was even on sale in bars where you could pay by credit card, where it replaced cocaine as the drug of choice among yuppies and even spread to people who normally kept well clear of drugs.

However, it was this public and unashamed use that resulted in the drug being outlawed. A deeply-embedded puritan ethic seems to affect the response to drugs in Western societies.

History of Ecstasy (MDMA)

To use a drug for pleasure is taboo 3yet to use a drug to relieve pain is acceptable. In reality there is no sharp distinction: But if that person is regarded as normal and takes a drug that makes him happy, he is indulging in something quite unacceptable.

Except, of course, if the drug happens to be nicotine or alcohol. The controversy provided free advertising which made Ecstasy spread like wildfire throughout the US.

It was a case of bad timing - the previous year there had been a widely publicised disaster that made the authorities overreact to any new scare.

On July 1st this right was used for the first time to ban MDMA - what is more, MDMA was put in the most restrictive category of all, reserved for damaging and addictive drugs without medical use.

The temporary ban only lasted for a year; meanwhile a hearing was set up to decide what permanent measures should be taken against the drug. The case received much publicity and was accompanied by press reports advancing the kind of scare stories now current in Europe, which added to the pressure to make the ban permanent.

One widely publicised report referred to evidence that another drug, MDA, caused brain damage in rats and concluded that MDMA could cause brain damage in humans.

The history of ecstasy a powerful drug used by many young people in britain

The case ended with the judge recommending that MDMA be placed in a less restrictive category, Schedule 3, which would have allowed it to be manufactured, to be used on prescription and to be the subject of research.

A group of MDMA supporters made a successful challenge to this decision in the Federal Court of Appeal, but their objections were overturned on 23rd March The fight is still continuing on the grounds that the law is unconstitutional, that the correct procedure was not followed and that the DEA did not take all the evidence into account.The synthetic drug “ecstasy,” which has been used increasingly among college students and young adults in recent years, also is being used at relatively high levels by America’s 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, according to NIDA’s Monitoring the Future study.

History Of Ecstasy Essay Examples. 3 total results. The History of Ecstasy, a Powerful Drug Used by Many Young People in Britain. 2, words.

The history of ecstasy a powerful drug used by many young people in britain

6 pages. The Controversial History of MDMA, a.k.a. X. words. 2 pages. A Research and History of Ecstasy. 1, words. 3 pages. Company. About Us; Contact; Resources;.

The proportion of young people taking Ecstasy is many times higher in Britain(22, 23), and here it is nearly always used as a dance drug. Americans generally use Ecstasy at home, although English-style raves are on the increase.

What Does Ecstasy Do? Get The Facts About MDMA - Drug-Free World

MDMA gained a small following among psychiatrists in the late s and early s, despite the fact that the drug had not undergone formal clinical trials nor received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in humans. Ecstasy is the popular name for the illicit, recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA.

It is known by many other terms including “Molly,” “E,” and “X." History of Ecstasy Anton Kollisch, a chemist at the pharmaceutical company Merck, first discovered MDMA in Germany in Researchers were not interested in the drug itself, but instead used.

Ecstasy is the popular name for the illicit, recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA. It is known by many other terms including “Molly,” “E,” and “X." History of Ecstasy Anton Kollisch, a chemist at the pharmaceutical company Merck, first discovered MDMA in Germany in Researchers were not interested in the drug itself, but instead used.

What is the history of MDMA? | National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)