Medeas actions and emotions in medea by euripides

A sorceress and a princess, she used her powers and influence to help Jason secure the Golden Fleece; then, having fallen in love with him, she fled her country and family to live with Jason in Iolcus, his own home. During the escape across the Mediterranean, she killed her brother and dumped him overboard, so that her pursuers would have to slow down and bury him. While in Iolcus, she again used her devilish cleverness to manipulate the daughters of the local king and rival, Pelias, into murdering their own father. Exiled as murderers, Jason and Medea settled in Corinth, the setting of Euripides' play, where they established a family of two children and gained a favorable reputation.

Medeas actions and emotions in medea by euripides

Student Answers aszerdi Student One could argue that Medea is not accountable for her actions if the Gods or Fates have influenced the course of her life and are acting through her.

Euripides' Medea tells of the trials and tribulations Medea faces through supporting Jason, taking care of her family, and finding solace in her revenge. One could support Medea's actions in two. Medea's pride drives her to unnecessarily brutal action. There is a tremendous sense of waste. She fully exacts her revenge, and then takes the brutality a step further, beyond the bounds of myth, by slaying her own children (Euripides' addition to the story). Words such as right and wrong are used unequivocally, but they are used to describe Jason's actions not Medea's. Jason's control is cold and inhuman, his plans selfseeking, his motivation immoral. In Medea, Euripides creates a very strong sense of place and of what those places represent.

Going for too much brings no benefits. And when gods get angry with some home, the more wealth it has, the more it is destroyed. However, her husband does not have the same desires and chooses to unfaithfully enter a relationship with another women for political advantage.

Jason has angered the Gods, and in this manner Medea could be an instrument for executing a kind of divine or fated justice.

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Similarly, it was her husband Jason who was unfaithful. Here Medea is not the individual whose behavior led to a lack of security and stability within her kingdom.

Furthermore, her behavior could be seen as commendable because she was a character of action rather than a passive female character who would be owned and governed by a man. Medea goes as far to take the lives of her own children.

While repulsive and cruel, this action is also symbolic. Because Jason destroyed their marriage, Medea also, in a strange way that once again could be argued as a twisted act of fate or justice, destroys the products of that marriage as well.

Unlock All Answers Now.Medea (Ancient Greek: Μήδεια, Mēdeia) is an ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripides, based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and first produced in BC.

The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a former princess of the " barbarian " kingdom of Colchis, and the wife of Jason; she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as. Medea's Actions and Emotions Medea's emotions throughout the myth were justified.

Medea's emotions were justified because Hera "made Medea, all bewildered with love and misery, determine to fly with Jason." ().

This emotion of love drove Medea to great lengths, causing her to k.

Medeas actions and emotions in medea by euripides

Words such as right and wrong are used unequivocally, but they are used to describe Jason's actions not Medea's.

Jason's control is cold and inhuman, his plans selfseeking, his motivation immoral.

Medeas actions and emotions in medea by euripides

In Medea, Euripides creates a very strong sense of place and of what those places represent. Euripides and Medea After the murder, Jason refers to Medea as an “abomination”, as the most detested of all woman.

Likewise, Medea says that Jason is “the most evil man alive”. Is Medea Justified In Her Actions? Is the killing of anyone ever Justified? Is the life of one individual more important than another? In Euripides, Medea, Medea kills the princess of Corinth, the king of Corinth, Creon, as well as her own children.

It is Medeas unhealthy obsession with Jason that causes her downfall. The imbalance of power between males and females allows Euripides to suggest that Medea;s actions against Jason are acceptable Euripides suggests that moderation in emotion and logical thinking is a key component to achieving emotional fulfilment.

Medea by Euripides - English Works