An analysis of the narrative of esther and mordecai

Summary Jonah Although often classified with the prophets, the Book of Jonah is not a prophetic book. The story, about a prophet named Jonah, was written to criticize and rebuke the narrow spirit of nationalism that Jonah observed among so many of the Jewish people. To accomplish this purpose, he constructed a story that would illustrate the spirit he wished to counteract.

An analysis of the narrative of esther and mordecai

An Analysis of the Book of Esther as Literature: And in recent years "a revival of interest in the literary qualities" of the Bible has occurred; the general reader can now be offered a new view of the Bible as a work of great literary force and authority" that has An analysis of the narrative of esther and mordecai "the minds and lives of intelligent men and women for two millennia and more" Alter and Kermode Alter makes a further claim for a literary approach: Frye, noted literary critic and teacher, maintains "that a student of English literature who does not know the Bible does not understand a good deal of what is going on in what he reads," with the best student "continually misconstruing the implications, even the meaning" Frye xii.

And since the "narrative is the dominant form in the Bible," the more readers understand "about how stories work, the more they will enjoy and understand vast portions of the Bible" Ryken How To So claims a rabbinic saying.

And one of the most captivating books of the Bible is Esther. Interest in the book of Esther has been both negative and positive.

Esther is the only book of the Hebrew Bible not represented among the Dead Sea scrolls. The book of Esther intrigues positively, too, one reason being its containing rationale for the celebration of the feast of Purim, the popularity of which "can be accounted for in part by the fact that it constitutes the only worldly holiday in the Jewish calendar for the expression of the light-hearted side of life" Harrison Part of the current scholarship interest in the "literary characteristics of the tale" of Esther results from the "incomplete knowledge the Persian period," shifting interest "from the identification of specific person and events" to more literary concerns, Berg 3.

Since the Bible stories did exist--with all their literary elements-millennia before the secular literature studied today, the integration approach underlining the base for this paper is basically compatibilist. Be it taught in secondary or college Bible or English classes.

Having narrative literary analysis skills is particularly valuable since the narrative is "the dominant genre of the Hebrew Bible" Alter, "Introduction" The first narrative element a reader should understand is plot, "the sequence of events in a story and their relation to one another" Charters And no one could "conceive of a more dramatic and surprising series of coincidences than those that led up to the exposure and death of Haman" Nichol, "Esther" The SDA Commentary outlines the plot into five well-organized sections: Esther Made Queen of Persia, 1: Esther Champions the Cause of Her People, 4: Similarly, "The Bible as a whole begins with a perfect world, descends into the misery of fallen history, and ends with a new world of total happiness and victory over evil" Ryken, How To Plot development "usually involves a conflict or, struggle between forces" Charter: Thompson mentions more specific conflicts.

Then the conflict centers on Haman and Mordecai, "a conflict between courtiers, but it is also a conflict between a son of Kish 2: Dialogue also serves to move plot along Charters ; however, Esther uses "far less dialogue than other narratives in Hebrew Scripture, and the storyteller sometimes attributes statements to groups rather than to individuals as in 3: A final plot device used is foreshadowing, an introduction of events, images, or words "into a narrative to suggest or anticipate later events that are central to the action and its resolution" Charters To help distinguish types, characters are often labeled flat or round.

The four main characters in the book of Esther are "deceptively static," or flat Sassonyet analysis reveals them to be more complex than they might at first appear. Of all the biblical heroines Esther has enjoyed greatest popularity among writers, artists, and musicians, representing feminine modesty, courage, and self-sacrifice" "Esther"a popularity due to her being the most complex, or round, character in the story.

Summary and Analysis Jonah, Ruth, and Esther Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List. Summary The narrative opens with an account of a royal feast that lasts for seven days. On the last day of the feast, the king asks his queen, Vashti, to display her royal beauty before the guests. Mordecai pleads with Esther to go before the king. But the plot became known to Mordecai, and he told Queen Esther, and Esther informed the king in Mordecai’s name (Esther ). The first thing to note is that soon after Esther became queen, a new virgin pageant began. The happy ending to Esther is the key to the whole story. It's what everyone's waiting for, the moment of the big turn-around. Haman and Mordecai change places.

From chapter 4 on, Esther is in control. However, Esther can" Jones As mentioned earlier, Mordecai experienced role reversals with Esther, she becoming his counselor and protector Jones At different points in the narrative Mordecai is shown to be proud, patriotic, solicitous, crafty, caring, revengeful, visionary--a round character indeed.

Haman is another complex character. However, these qualities are overshadowed and destroyed by his blind hatred of Mordecai, which leads him to abandon his plan and, seek a more immediate fulfillment of his ends," which leads "in turn to a rashness that climaxes in the beginning of his fall in ch.

Sasson also views Haman as complex, showing that the storyteller gave Haman "a rich assortment of postures befitting his evil character. Yet Haman is not one-dimensional. When told he will be overcome by the Jew Mordecai, he "comes to realize the consequences of his own acts" Sasson The fourth main character is the king, Ahaseurus, "a capricious, despotic, passionate man" Harrison who is "much puffed up" Clarke His love of wine and his general insensitivity is demonstrated by his drinking with Haman shortly after having the first genocide edict published, although the city of Susa was troubled Jones In Esther , the word “king” is used 29 times, indicating the centrality of Ahasuerus to the introductory narrative.

In , the Jewish queen responds to Mordecai’s counsel to plead before Ahasuerus for the Jews’ lives with an articulate response that includes the word “king” five times. Many more examples are provided in this analysis of one of the Bible’s most fascinating books.

An analysis of the narrative of esther and mordecai

The Outer Narrative and the Hidden Reading Esther. The Outer Narrative and the Hidden Reading. The Greatness of the King and the Greatness of Mordecai (Esther 10) Conclusion. Indexes. Character Of Esther In The Biblical Narratives English Literature Essay. Print Reference this. Disclaimer: It is an amazing narrative that ties tragedy and triumph.

The composition of this book may well have been at the end of the Persian Empire and toward the end of the fourth century B.C. (Matthews & Moyer, , p.

An analysis of the narrative of esther and mordecai

). We must not. Narrative Analysis of Esther 1. The setting in the book of Esther is provided in chapter 1. It tells us that King issued Mordecai call on Esther to intercede for the Jews. She at first is a bit unhurried, but Mordecai promptly reminds her that even though she is in the.

An Analysis of the Book of Esther as Literature: A Methodology for Using the Book of Esther. In Secondary or College English or Bible Classes. At different points in the narrative Mordecai is shown to be proud, patriotic, solicitous, crafty, caring, revengeful.

Summary and Analysis Jonah, Ruth, and Esther Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List. Summary The narrative opens with an account of a royal feast that lasts for seven days. On the last day of the feast, the king asks his queen, Vashti, to display her royal beauty before the guests.

Mordecai pleads with Esther to go before the king.

An Analysis of the Book of Esther as Literature